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About Mark Rubin

Mark is dedicated to helping families in North Texas through difficult financial problems. He insists on a personal touch that most bankruptcy attorneys in Dallas are too busy to provide. Call today for a free consultation and speak directly with Mark.

8 Holiday Shopping Tips for 2019 To Avoid Racking Up Debt

The 2019 holiday shopping season is almost upon us. Notoriously, holiday shopping is one of the largest contributors to increased credit card debt – people get in the holiday spirit and spend much more than they should.

This year, you can shop smarter and still get gifts for everyone on your list, all while avoiding additional credit card debt. With a bit of planning and a smidgen of self control, you won’t have to be afraid of this year’s holiday shopping season. (more…)

7 Tips for Saving Money and Avoiding Debt

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As we’ve mentioned in the past, the easiest way to avoid bankruptcy is to avoid accruing debt in the first place. Millions of Americans live with thousands of dollars in debt, and a single bump in the road like a car accident or the loss of a job can send them spiraling towards uncontrollable debt.

The sooner you form responsible spending habits, the sooner you’ll build a solid foundation that will help avoid the possibility of bankruptcy. If you follow these 7 simple tips, you’ll be able to save money and avoid accumulating debts that you struggle to pay off.

1. Plan all of your meals

Eating out is the biggest monthly expense in most households. If you plan all of your meals each week and cook at home, you’ll save money – and you’ll probably eat healthier as well.

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Busting 5 common bankruptcy myths

bankruptcy mythsWhen potential clients call us, they’re usually pretty scared. When you’re drowning in controllable debt and you’re in danger of losing your car or your house, being afraid is understandable.

When you’re scared, it’s easy to believe just about anything you hear. There are tons of myths and misconceptions about bankruptcy floating around, so we thought it’d be helpful to dispel some of the more common myths. So without further ado, here’s the truth behind the 5 most common myths about bankruptcy:

1) Only bad people file for bankruptcy

Bad things happen to good people all the time. It doesn’t take much to start a downward spiral of debt – a sudden job loss, a salary reduction, or an accident with huge medical bills might be all it takes to cause your debts to spiral out of control. Bankruptcy laws were created to give good people a fresh start – you’re definitely not alone! (more…)

5 signs you’re living beyond your means

signs you're living beyond your meansBankruptcy is more common than most of our clients think… in today’s world, it’s far too easy to run up overwhelming debt and lose control. While an unexpected bump in the road (like an automobile accident or loss of a job) can lead to a bankruptcy situation, many times people start down the road because they’re simply living beyond their means.

If you’re spending more money than you’re making, then you’re living beyond your means. Society pushes for instant gratification and a “you only live once” mentality – but that’s not a great strategy for handling your debts.

It doesn’t take much to start living beyond your means, and many times, it’s the beginning of a downward spiral that can’t be stopped. Once the debt starts to multiply, it’s harder and harder to find your way out of the difficult situation you’ve put yourself in.

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What can filing bankruptcy do?

Are you a good, honest, hard worker who’s fallen on tough times? It doesn’t take much for most Americans – an unexpected major accident, the sudden loss of a job, a major home repair… Any unexpected major expense can start the downward spiral into uncontrollable debt.

It happens to the best of people all the time – don’t beat yourself up. Out-of-control debt doesn’t mean you’re a bad person.

Bankruptcy was created specifically for situations like yours. When you file for bankruptcy, you get the help you need – and you get it fast. Here are some of the immediate benefits of bankruptcy:

  • Stop those nasty creditor calls.
  • Keep and protect your property.
  • Stop repossessions of vehicles.
  • Stop foreclosure on your home or other property.
  • Stop legal action.
  • Get released from credit cards, medical bills, personal loans and other unsecured debts you can’t afford.
  • Break out of the minimum payments trap.
  • Lower your total monthly payments by hundreds of dollars.
  • Get help catching up on important bills, like your mortgage and car loans.
  • Make catching up affordable, by stretching out the payment of overdue payments (up to 5 years, if need be).
  • Get released from certain old marital debts.
  • Get rid of certain older income taxes.
  • Get rid of mortgage foreclosure deficiencies.
  • Get rid of repossession deficiencies.
  • Start rebuilding your credit.

Bankruptcy offers emotional support as well:

  • Start enjoying life again without the worry of bills.
  • Reduce your stress level.
  • Start putting your family first.
  • Start sleeping at night.
  • Get your life back.
  • Get in a position to quit the second or third job.
  • Start your life moving forward again.
  • Feel like you stood up and took control.
  • Get a second chance for a ‘fresh start’.

Rubin & Associates can help you with all of these and more. Call us today for a FREE consultation at 214-760-7777 – we’ll listen to your story and walk you through all of your options. Let us help you get a fresh start today!

Bankruptcy is debt insurance

Filing bankruptcy doesn’t mean you’re a bad person. Not at all, in fact. Most of the time, it just means you got stuck in a bad debt situation.

Lots of good, honest, hard-working people get stuck in bad debt situations. Most people who file bankruptcy are good people who’ve had a few bad things happen to them. One bad “bump in the road” can set you down the path to bankruptcy – the sudden loss of your job or a car accident is all it takes for most people.

Let’s face it, life can be brutal. That’s why you buy life insurance, and homeowners insurance, and car insurance. And that’s why you have bankruptcy.
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By | May 27th, 2019|Bankruptcy|Comments Off on Bankruptcy is debt insurance

3 Bankruptcy Myths

bankruptcy mythsOne of the most frustrating things about bankruptcy is that it’s so misunderstood. You don’t really care much about it until you’re in a dire situation and need it – and then there’s so much myth and misinformation it becomes an incredibly daunting task to decide how you’ll proceed.

So today, we’re here to bust a few of the most common myths about bankruptcy. As always, if you’re in a situation where you don’t think there’s any other option, please call us – we’re happy to walk you through all of your options.

Myth #1: After bankruptcy, you’ll have no credit for 7 to 10 years

There is no truth to the bankruptcy myth that you have to wait through seven years with bad credit after filing bankruptcy. Bankruptcy does show on your credit report for 10 years, but even so, you can regain good credit in just three years. Our clients often have purchased cars and even qualified for mortgages only two to three years after bankruptcy.

People who file bankruptcy are often surprised by how quickly they’ll start getting credit card offers in the mail again. Offers for unsecured or secured credit cards (which require a deposit to the bank) with a low limit can arrive within a month of the debt discharge. Some of these cards are unsecured. Some are even offered to people by the same credit card company that was listed on the bankruptcy.

It’s a good idea to get a small credit card and start making regular, on-time payments to start rebuilding your credit. With three years of rebuilding credit, you will be able to finance a house at a good mortgage rate (if you are making enough money).

After only a year of rebuilding your credit, you will start getting approved for $1000 and higher credit cards again. Ninety percent of your credit score is based on what you’ve done the last three years. So once you have three good years after bankruptcy, you’ll have a good credit score.

Myth #2: You can’t fix your credit report after bankruptcy

After we help you through the bankruptcy process, we make sure you know to do the things you need to do to get good credit in three years. We also follow up with the credit bureaus after your bankruptcy is over to make sure your credit reports are right.

It is necessary to check your credit report after bankruptcy because major credit card companies try to leave bad marks on your credit report. They hope that these bad marks will cause trouble for people who filed bankruptcy, and they hope that consumers will pay the bankrupt debt to remove it. About 50% of our clients have this problem.

We invite all of our clients to visit us after the bankruptcy and we take action to make the credit card companies remove any bad marks from credit reports.

Myth #3: People who file for bankruptcy are financially irresponsible.

“It’s far more likely that people run into very serious personal problems in one of three areas: losing their job, going through a divorce, or suffering a serious illness,” says Walter W. Miller Jr., who teaches bankruptcy law at Boston University School of Law.

Long-term unemployment, the legal fees associated with divorce, the cost of running two households following a divorce, or the high cost of medical care have all driven well-intentioned Americans into bankruptcy. It really doesn’t take much of a bump in the road to send you into out of control debt.

We’ve helped thousands of honest, hard-working Dallas area residents get a fresh start. Sometimes bad things happen to good people, and we’re here to help if that happens to you.

Call us any time at 214-760-7777 and we’ll be happy to listen to your story and walk you through your options.

By | February 24th, 2019|Bankruptcy Myths|Comments Off on 3 Bankruptcy Myths

How are credit scores computed?

how are credit scores calculated?Credit, by definition, is your ability to borrow money. Information that is included on your credit report could sway a potential lender one way or another in deciding whether to extend credit to you.

There are 3 major credit reporting bureaus:
Equifax
1-888-548-7878
www.equifax.com

Experian
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

TransUnion
1-800-916-8800
www.transunion.com

Under Federal law, you are entitled to a copy of a free credit report from each credit bureau each year. The credit bureaus have established a website in which to obtain a free copy of your credit report at www.annualcreditreport.com.

A credit report is more than just a list of the lenders and a person’s payment history. Credit reports contain information that can be used to help lenders determine whether to extend credit to you.

Here is a list of some of the things a credit report may list:

  1. Anywhere you have applied for credit
  2. Your name, Social Security Number, and your spouse’s name
  3. Your current and previous addresses, name and address of your employer, as well as your income level
  4. Information regarding lawsuits, foreclosures, repossessions, and whether you have filed for bankruptcy

Why are all these pieces of information listed on your credit report? Companies want to know whether you can be counted on to pay back your debts. Not only do lenders look at your credit report, but insurance companies look for risk factors on it, employers can use it to screen applicants, and landlords can use it to screen tenants to determine if they are likely to pay the rent on time.

Lenders use all of the information on your report to derive a credit score on you. A credit score is a number used to rate your credit worthiness. There are a number of different scoring systems. One scoring system is known as the Fair Isaac Corporation (FICO) Credit Score. This score ranges between 300 and 850. According to FICO, 40% of the population score at 690 or lower, while 40% score 745 or higher, with just 20% above 780.

Lenders want to know whether a borrower will repay a debt once a loan is extended. Then, the lender can use the score to determine how much to lend you, and what interest rate to charge you. Lenders assign points to the various aspects of your credit report.

Five factors are weighed most heavily when making this calculation:

  1. Debt to income ratio. This is the proportion of how much total debt you have relative to your income level. This is the single largest factor that creditors consider in determining whether or not to extend a loan or other credit to you. Even if you have no balance on a credit card, your credit limit is still added to the debt side of your debt-to-income ratio.
  2. Payment history. This factor considers whether you have paid your debts on time, including mortgages, car notes, credit cards, store accounts and loans.
  3. Length of credit history. Lenders look to see how long you have paid on your debts. Good past payment history can help sway a lender to loan you money if you’ve had recent issues that could negatively affect your ability to get the credit.
  4. Recent credit or applications for credit. If a lender sees that they are the tenth place this month that you are trying to borrow from, it could send up red flags.
  5. The type of credit for which you are applying. Lenders that will retain a security interest in collateral, such as a car or mortgage company, may be more willing to lend money to more ‘at risk’ borrowers when the lender knows that they can always take back the collateral in the event of default on payments.

Other factors that lenders look at to determine who is a good credit risk are:

  1. Education level. The higher the better.
  2. Length of time at current residence. If you move around a lot, you lose points, but if you relocate for a better job and show your income is higher, that helps get you points.
  3. Length of time at your current job. The longer you have been at your job, the better risk you appear to be.
  4. Homeowner v. Renter. Homeowners are considered better credit risks than renters.

Creditors like stability. If you can show you are a stable, reliable person who has the ability to repay your debts, you will be a much better credit risk to a potential lender.

Everyone should always review his or her credit report periodically. Errors can be and are made. Just a few points can make or break your ability to acquire new credit. Therefore, it’s crucial to have an accurate credit report. Over the last few years, identity theft has become a bigger and bigger problem as well. An uncorrected error can cause years of stress and frustration. The credit reporting bureaus must correct any inaccurate information on your credit report, but you need to bring the inaccurate information to their attention. Once corrected, the bureau is supposed to send you a free copy of the credit report showing that the inaccuracy was corrected.

How to choose the right bankruptcy lawyer

how to choose the right bankruptcy lawyerIf you’re struggling with debt and considering bankruptcy, the biggest question in your mind is probably “Which bankruptcy lawyer should I go to?” It’s one of the most important decisions to make – filing bankruptcy will have a significant impact on your life. Bankruptcy law is very complex, with many twists and turns, and traps for the unwary. If you need to file bankruptcy, choosing the right lawyer is critical.

The simple truth is that a more experienced attorney will do a better job, which means getting you the most benefit from filing and avoiding the mistakes that someone less experienced is bound to make.

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6 Tips to Keep Holiday Spending Under Control

tips for controlling holiday spendingIt’s that time of year… Holiday shopping is stressful for everyone, but it’s especially tough for families that are already struggling with overwhelming debt. You don’t have to spend a fortune to have a happy holiday season! Follow these tips and you’ll reign in the spending and skip the spending stress.

1. Make your own list

Santa makes a list and checks it twice – you should too. It’s easy to get caught up in the gift-buying frenzy, but you don’t have to give gifts to everyone! Make a list of everyone you’re buying gifts for – aim for less than 6 people outside of your immediate family. For everyone else, bake cookies – it’s a more personal gift and lets you still acknowledge friends without breaking the bank. (more…)